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Islam in tribal societies From the Atlas to the Indus

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Published by Routledge & Kegan Paul .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Sociology - General,
  • Sociology

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsAkbar S. Ahmed (Other Contributor), David M. Hart (Other Contributor)
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages343
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7780193M
ISBN 100710093209
ISBN 109780710093202

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Islam in Tribal Societies: From the Atlas to the Indus - Kindle edition by Ahmed, Akbar S.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Islam in Tribal Societies Author: Akbar S. Ahmed.   A lively debate is currently being conducted in the social sciences around the concepts of "tribe", "segmentary societies" and "Islam in society". This wide-ranging collection by thirteen distinguished anthropologists contributes to the debate by examining various segmentary Islamic tribal societies from Morocco to by: A lively debate is currently being conducted in the social sciences around the concepts of "tribe", "segmentary societies" and "Islam in society". This wide-ranging collection by thirteen distinguished anthropologists contributes to the debate by examining various segmentary Islamic tribal societies from Morocco to Pakistan. Islam in tribal societies: from the Atlas to the Indus. [Akbar S Ahmed; David M Hart;] -- A lively debate is currently being conducted in the social sciences around the concepts of "tribe", "segmentary societies" and "Islam in society".

Doctor and saint --Arbitration as a political institution: an interpretation of the status of monarchy in Morocco --Segmentary systems and the role of 'five fifths' in tribal Morocco --Cultural resistance and religious legitimacy in colonial Algeria --Sufism in Somaliland: a study in tribal Islam --Alliance and descent in the Middle East and the 'problem' of patrilateral parallel cousin . The Quran is the holy book for Muslims around the world. Islam has about billion believers spread around the world. The faith believes in the same monotheistic God as the Old and New Testaments, but that the final messenger of God was Mohamed, who in A.D. began to receive new revelations from God. Those revelations were written in the. A Tribal Theology From A Tribal World -View K PA!eaz* Tribal theology in India is in the making. There are more or less three approaches to tribal world-view evident in Tribal theologians while theologising. First is the approach of contextualisation and lndigenisation represented by senior thinkers lik~ Nirmal Minz and the late Renthy Keitzer. There are many non-Muslim tribal societies among Hindus, African pagans and Christians etc. Tribalism is an age-old phenomenon that pre-dates Islam .

  The preservation of a social order depends on each and every member of that society freely adhering to the same moral principles and practices. Islam, founded on individual and collective morality and responsibility, introduced a social revolution in the context in which it was first revealed. Collective morality is expressed in the Qur'an in. noted that 80 percent of the societies that he studied had some type of polygamy. Matriarchies emerged among Native-American tribal societies and in nations in which. Which sociologist published a book in in which he noted that it was no mere coincidence that an overwhelming number of business leaders, owners of capital, and.   In these patrilineal societies the Islamic identity thus sanctioned confers legitimacy on practices that may differ significantly from the Islamic norms applied elsewhere. For example, the Pukhtunwali, or tribal code, of the Pukhtun people of Pakistan and Afghanistan combines notions of hospitality and revenge with the “constant compulsion. Islam also reflects tribal notions of honor with regard to women. Within the Arab tribal society in which Muhammad was born, women's reproductive capacity was necessary for lineage strength. The ability of the lineage to allocate women where needed most for strategic purposes, whether endogamously to contribute to the number of offspring or.